Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Julkalender, lucka tjugo

Minns du denna gås?
Och vad som finns i dess krås..?
"You know Peterson, the commissionaire?'
'Yes.'
'It is to him that this trophy belongs.'
'It is his hat?'
'No, no; he found it. Its owner is unknown. I beg that you will look upon it, not as a battered billycock, but as an intellectual problem. And, first as to how it came here. It arrived upon Christmas morning, in company with a good fat goose, which is, I have no doubt, roasting at this moment in front of Peterson's fire. The facts are these. About four o'clock on Christmas morning, Peterson, who, as you know, is a very honest fellow, was returning from some small jollification, and was making his way homewards down Tottenham Court Road. In front of him he saw, in the gaslight, a tallish man, walking with a slight stagger, and carrying a white goose slung over his shoulder. As he reached the corner of Goodge Street a row broke out between this stranger and a little knot of roughs. One of the latter knocked off the man's hat, on which he raised his stick to defend himself, and, swinging it over his head, smashed the shop window behind him. Peterson had rushed forward to protect the stranger from his assailants, but the man, shocked at having broken the window and seeing an official-looking person in uniform rushing towards him, dropped his goose, took to his heels, and vanished amid the labyrinth of small streets which lie at the back of Tottenham Court Road. The roughs had also fled at the appearance of Peterson, so that he was left in possession of the field of battle, and also of the spoils of victory in the shape of this battered hat and a most unimpeachable Christmas goose.'
'Which surely he restored to their owner?'
'My dear fellow, there lies the problem."

5 comments:

  1. Äntligen något jag kan! Det här är Sherlock Holmes, ett mysterium om en blå ädelsten som en dum gås mumsat i sig - vilket ställer till bekymmer när gässen ska slaktas lagom till jul och man inte riktigt har koll på VILKEN gås som ätit juvelen. "Den blå karbunkeln" tror jag den heter. Fin liten historia som jag recenserade ganska nyligen :-)

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    Replies
    1. Ah! Jag var lite för sen kronologiskt i mitt deckartänk där!

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  2. Hmm, nu tycker jag att det börjar låta som Wodehouse eller Sayers igen. Den där småputtriga mellankrigsengelskheten.

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